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Old 2nd June 2003, 12:11 PM
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Timokay
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Is Homeopathy the same as electronic medicine? Or are there fundamental differences?

The modulator says its not possible to measure biological fields: So what have the psycholologists + the Drugs industry who hve suppresed info., been up to all this time... Measuring brain function and heart rate: Scientists like Michael Persinger pass low frequency into peoples brains and get them to hallucinateThe Secret Life of Ghosts and werewolves BBC 2001 )Because he has created a electronic stimulious or is it the fact he has stimulated a chemical responce, with a particular sine wave: The military + police use a combination of either low frequency on its own, as mentioned on "Tommorow`s World" in November 2001: (But they can use it in combination with microwaves) as "crowd control" devices:

This energy they use is largly beyond detection on a bog standard meter: Because it hard to measure low frequency: The only way to do it is to record the info. with a special analyser which goes down to 1Hz and below.. Then speed the tape up to find the information. Much the same as the militry, and naturlists socilties do with birds, Dolphins and Bats. That will bring the info. back on scale.

The miltary have been into this for years: They use it the combination of low frequency and microwaves as a weapon/communication system. As its much more powerful than radio systems. If measured with bog standard meters the microwave would only be detectable within normal limits. As was reported on BBC Horizon in 1995: In 1999 The Secret KGB Files reapeted the same story other signals were found to be present: Most of the staff at the USA embasy in Moscow had head and throat cancer as well as psychological problems. Some how this information got muddled and retold.. That some scientists thought microwaves should be set at a lower level... They did not conclued that low freq. was being used. Which acted as a "Carrier Wave" or amplifyier. The low frequency went largly undetected.

Since the 1980`s the Essence of this the 1995 Horizon program said that USA psychics were being put in faraday cages: Which they thought stopped outside effects.. Where`s like the low frequency systems used for a weapon or crowd control.. It amplified rather than just protected the indervidual.. They did not say they were using the low frequency as and other systems combined on that program.. But there is enough information around under a number of headings that suggest low frequency was being used to enhance their ablity as well as using it to heal, but also to interfere with other beings..

Medics in this country have got hold of this equipment to make the,equivlant of homeopathic medicine.. Which is far more introsive than the old radionic system invented by Rae et al in the 1930`s. That was only a glorified radio.

Psychologist esp. in the USA should know about the effects of these machines esp. Dr. P., The USA government have taken special licneces out, even though these devices were band in the 1950`s.. While the UK protection agencies don`t seem to have any understanding.. Of the saftey implications: Because main stream science does not know how to interprite data in the correct manor.. They are relying on out moded ways of just seeing the world at a chemical level, rather than the bodies responce to a electrical substance be it added directly to the body through pills or whether it comes over the air ways. Some say we only take the frequencies we need: That may be a exuses of whether people understand on a human level or whether direct measurment was taken.. I supect like everything else, is more what the eye don`t see can`t harm or help..

So we can just do, if you don`t know: If you do know you are oversenstive?

Electronic medicine may have some aspects of the more traditional Homeopathic medicine.. Its effects are much more potient.. Than traditional med. We are not dealing with the same animal. In simplistic terms electronic versions are more yang in nature than traditional made systems. Rather than being a balanced product. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Clare D - 123rd post - 22 May 2003 15:10
come again?!!
It is not at all hard to measure low frequencies.

Dolphins and bats emit ultrasound, not electromagnetic waves. And it's at very high frequency. The reason they artificially slow the recording down on wildlife programmes is so that it gets down low enough so that we can hear it.

I'm not aware of microwaves being used as a weapon system. Microwaves don't cause cancer. They don't have enough energy to muck up the chemical bonds in your DNA. All they do is jiggle water bonds around a bit to heat things. And microwave communication transmitters wouldn't even do that.

It doesn't make sense to say that low frequencies enhance psychic ability as psychic ability has not been demonstrated.

"main stream science does not know how to interprite data in the correct manor". Goodness me, I wonder how we ever managed to get planes in the air then.
There is no such thing as an "electrical substance".
Cheers then [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Paul Elliott - 864th post - 23 May 2003 10:08
Carol has some very... interesting ideas. I'm still waiting to be told how any chemical compound can be synthesised electronically, it would make my life a lot easier at the moment. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 129th post - 24 May 2003 22:08

Paul,

Its part of these anti-gravity systems ability to generate low frequency, they create a type of Faraday Cage effect/electrostatic field: These systems stop normal earthing.. Which help retain the information. A sine wave of any substance could be made on a GLC machine: That sine wave could be passed directly into a substrate: Or even a solid object.. In combination with the low frequency, it carriers the information further into the body or any other object.. "Barrie Trower" and tetra: There is some interconnecting info.. about this information.. Low freq being taken further into the body..

"Swiss scientists warn about Robots" might still be on the net: The military are able to programme any microprossesor to be you or another person.. By a combination of low frequency systems or you directly. You can not in general terms, create the soild.. The sine wave will cause a biochemical reaction until other componants in the body are deminished: The electrical simulus may be increased, without increase in biochemical reaction:

Scientists under various names, "quantum physics": Are able to move soild matter from place to place.. It was thought that large amounts of energy were needed to change one substance into another.. These anti-gravity systems harness large amounts of energy.. In which anything can be done or made.. There are scientist working on it and have done for many years.. No matter how much jo public says I see no ships.. Or Scientist in main stream science: What makes you and me, can be vibrated, in or out of various sets of molcules. All there is needed is some sort of focusing require and Co-ordiantes. Again this sort of stuff is under military applications.. They seem to have little understanding in "quatum physics" of the total effect on all of us, making or doing this type of work.. They might say or talk about Butterflies doing whatever. There is no one able to put controls on things.. As main stream science does not know what they are up to: They could be playing with lollypops.. An some idot will say its all lies it can`t be true, so they carry on.. This science is not new, Why people think it is a belif system? If they don`t believe, they can`t do anything to me.. I am perfectly safe.

Or at least I hope I am? I will just say one more time then I don`t believe in all this "Hocus Pocus". Lets all say it perhaps it might help. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Raymo UK - 170th post - 25 May 2003 18:44
re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 134th post - 26 May 2003 00:56

raymouk,

Sorry they do exist.. Have a look for Zero point on Amazon. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy OTLSJ - 89th post - 23 May 2003 12:03
"chemical compound can be synthesised electronically" ever heard of electroylsis, quit a major branch of chemistry [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Paul Elliott - 868th post - 23 May 2003 13:06
But you can hardly make "any compound" by electrolysis now can you. Apparently there's a marvellous technology which exists which we academic chemists and industrial chemists deny and cover up (muhahahahahah!!!!) by which you can make any compound by electronic waves, piff-paff-poof, and you've got taxol!
I think not. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 10th post - 23 May 2003 00:09
An interesting electronic device to treat ailments is the "Bicom 2000" - which seems to be proving very successful. (You can find out more if you search for it.....) It appears to normalise the body's unbalanced electromagnetic frequency patterns with spectacular results. Perhaps this is what Radionic treatment and other 'subtle energy' based systems like Homeopathy and Acupuncture are doing aswell? Regarding the dangers of microwave radiation (mobile phones/transmitters) - it seems that the biological damage is not done by the heating effect of the radiation, (which is what the 'safe limits' are based on regarding telecommunication equipment) but is due to the action of the radio frequencies on the brain waves of the subject. A lot of information has been suppressed by the big phone companies (rather like what the cigarette companies did when one of their experts discovered they were carcinogenic - but eventually the truth came out.)
Also, there are lots of studies out there which do demonstrate various types of psychic ability, but it is fashionable either to ignore the evidence and pretend it doesn't exist, or debunk the scientists involved - it would mean that science would have to move its goal posts but eventually that will have to happen. A lot of 'science' has been shown to be incorrect from what I learned at school - slowly but surely the new science filters through into society....... have a look at the work of Rupert Sheldrake. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Paul Elliott - 863rd post - 23 May 2003 10:07
"It appears to normalise the body's unbalanced electromagnetic frequency patterns ..."
Erm, 'electromganteic frequency patterns'? That sound like someone trying to blag it that they know what they talk about, ie psuedo-science, the enemy of public understanding of science.

"Regarding the dangers of microwave radiation (mobile phones/transmitters) - it seems that the biological damage is not done by the heating effect of the radiation, (which is what the 'safe limits' are based on regarding telecommunication equipment) but is due to the action of the radio frequencies on the brain waves of the subject"

Erm? Radio waves are at even lower frequency and energy to microwaves so are orders of magnitude less likely to cause damage. And exactly how does a radio waves affect ion migration across membranes, journal references please.

"...fashionable either to ignore the evidence..."

What evidence, and what do you mean by fashionable, if you mean we have degrees in scientific subjects so that we know that the calptrap someone is banging on about was disproved 70 years ago, then hey, we're ain't geeks after all!

". A lot of 'science' has been shown to be incorrect from what I learned at school"

Er, no, it was simplified The real scientific world is really quite complicated and so unsuitable to teach at school age. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 13th post - 24 May 2003 01:15

"Electromagnetic frequency patterns" refers to the work of Fritz-Albert Popp - that living organisms emit light photons (eg rudimentary plants or animals emit 100 photons/cm2/sec at a wavelength of 200-800 nanometres, humans 10 photons for same area/time/frequency. In illness, these patterns become disturbed.)

Regarding microwave radiation from mobile phones, why is it I read that emissions from them can be, depending on the type, either 'continuous wave or pulsed microwave RF' (doesn't RF stand for 'radio frequency'?) (see paper by Drs. Henry Lai and N.P. Singh, University of Washington, Seattle) Also, look for Dr Gerald Hyland's work (he is a physicist at University of Warwick and government adviser on mobile phones) - he says "there are many reports over the past 30 years that MWR can exert non-thermal influences, at intensities well below those necessary to cause any detectable heating" and that there are "reported biological impacts of exposure to this radiation, particularly those provoked by the contentious non-thermal effects." He believes that the pulsed MWR has effects on biological electrical activities in the brain at a cellular level. Have a look for yourself - I can't keep putting quotes on here! As for 'science' changing over time, having trained as a medical radiographer years ago I am aware that a lot of factors have changed today. For example, the 'safe levels' of ionising radiation have progressively been reduced as harmful genetic effects have become apparent over the generations. My boss at that time had been taught that an electric current travels from the positive terminal to the negative, and then had to relearn it the other way round once the electron had been discovered. Is that 'simplified' or 'incorrect'?? [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 136th post - 26 May 2003 01:09
Vanessa,
Hyland has retired is there anyone else in this country? There was work being done in Liverpool uni. where he was trained is no longer done.. Bristol uni. does not have much understanding or Coventry uni.. Prof. C. Smith used to be at Salford uni. He is into Bicom.. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 31st post - 26 May 2003 17:54
As far as I know, Gerald Hyland is still involved to some extent - I went to a lecture he gave last year here in Winchester, as a local school has been trying to prevent a mobile phone mast being erected nearby. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Clare D - 127th post - 27 May 2003 13:55
The fact the one man is researching a theory doesn't mean it's true or even plausible. Nothing in science can be really taken seriously until it is independently replicated. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 41st post - 28 May 2003 12:58
He isn't one man researching a theory, he has brought together all the available research that has been done/is being done around the world. And it isn't a theory any more - there seems to be sufficient proof that mobile phone radiaton does cause biological damage in a non-thermal way. That's why the research continues, so that there is enough evidence to make it through to the government and the general public. If there weren't people like him around we may never understand what dangers modern technologies may bring...... [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 126th post - 23 May 2003 19:56

Vanessa,

I will have a look at Rupert Sheldrake thank you: There are problems with "Bicom". I was told several medics did not like the radiation effects. They complained to the company in Germany. The companies solution was to give them a crystal.

You are suppose to say various affimations with this systems in order to programme effects. It says in the instructions, that the sine wave is inverted and the patients condition is feed back to them at a low potency: The trouble is its not doing that, the machine uses different types of sine waves other than the normal "S" shape it might use square or stepped which makes it produce subfrequencies.. Most of the energy is off scale.. So I don`t believe, Bicom don`t know how the machine works: The wave inversion makes more low frequency like wise the different shape sine wave crates, still more low freq. My experiance of these machines they produce high levels of electrostatic fields.. Which radiated out about a good 15/20ft. Its worse when the machine switches off, it leaves any toxins that came out of the patient/pratitioner to perminate the fabric of the building and surrounding area:

It creats an electromagnetic smog.. There are supposed to be cleansing programmes which are not very effective.. Yes I do believe there have been good reports in some people. This and other machines cause geopathic stress. While they are running they work like a catalyst.. Drawing out toxins from the body.. They have effects of pulling in Currie Grids and Hartman layer.. Which puts back ground energies out. There is not enough understanding that taking too much toxin out of the patient causes a back ground energy problems: They are over healed or over withdrawn: Which leads to them disrupting ground transmission lines in and around their own homes. If that the case its dread to think what`s happening where the practitioner is working how much energy is being mix and matched.. In this electronic smog.. THERE IS NO WAY OF ISOLATING THIS ENERGY ITS VERY CLOSELY RELATED TO NEUCLEAR RADIATION IN SOME ASPECTS: It also creates a long period vibration which goes through anything..(this is the same as earth quakes and volcanoes).

These systems relate back to the "Tom Bearden website" and Henry Moray also anti-gravity systems. Tessla. Tom Bearden has made his own version of Biocom. I don`t think he understands how powerful these systems are: THEY ARE TOO POWERFUL TO EARTH: They do not feel like finding a place which has naturally good ionisation and healing.. Its very artifical it lacks something, as I think I said its all yang and no yin..

THERE IS NO ORGANISATION IN PLACE TO ASSESS THE SAFETY, of these systems.. The NRPB or HSE have not the experties. Because they still see theses types of devices as low energy.. Even "Free Energy devices".

There is nothing new about this technology, just a combination of Scientists wanting to do their own thing.. Each in their very very tinney world. Saying I see no ships, or molecules. Therefore it does not exist? It Can`t exist because I can`t see it or feel it. What about electricity?

Some people don`t feel much because they have a poor up take of energy along with understanding.. Like teaching a person who has not seen and regained their sight, at some stage in their life they did not learn.. While others who do feel things have a good up take.. They are mislabled as oversensitive and perhaps daft. Where`s the truth is quite the opposite. It the ones who can`t feel who are the daft ones: Who rely on meters that may or may not tell you what the real energies doing.

Have you looked at the "Homeopathyhome"? [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 126th post - 23 May 2003 21:34
Venessa,
If any of the above seems garbled I have to compete with me husband saying I want me dinner, something us ladies have cope with: [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 15th post - 24 May 2003 02:00
I can sympathise - it's my husband and 4 children clamouring for their food. (Not at this time of night, though...) [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 124th post - 23 May 2003 17:59
Clare,
Animals use low frequency to carry information over distance.. Where the ultra sound would only travel a short way.. They use both systems to judge distance I would think.. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 125th post - 23 May 2003 18:11
Clare D,
I am not saying you can`t measure low freq. but the lower you go down the scale the harder it is to measure. There is a feed back between the higher freqencies and the low frequencies.. Where energy is not acuratly measured, not even calculated mathamatically.. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Tim Kelleher - 64th post - 24 May 2003 12:18
Clare,
Yes, I also think that all these therapies, including Homeopathy, mediate their actions thru some form of radiation (possibly e/m), with the Brain as the target in all cases. Tim [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Simon Baker - 1091st post - 22 May 2003 15:21
What is a 'bog standard meter'? [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy alan calverd - 1078th post - 25 May 2003 12:24
1. A stick 39.37 inches long
2. An AVO meter (very good for measuring low frequency currents)

3. A soil hygrometer

4. A toilet gas analyser0A [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 136th post - 26 May 2003 01:36

Alan,

Very good! We cast a few spells with the stick or perhaps beat some sense into a few of them, or even some Feng shui? I think a fatal electric shock might do better perhaps, then a Avo.. Would a soil hygrometer know if the world is round or perhaps flat? What to do with the toilet gas analyser, I wonder if its good at detecting ghosts, or which way the wind might be blowing.. Could it be adustied to find the etheric body? Or perhaps suck it up like ghost busters: Though I think a broom might be the best anti-gravity system: [reply]

HERE

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Tim Kelleher - 66th post - 24 May 2003 14:43
I think she means that the Military and Police went in this direction of using other Frequency ranges as carriers of secret information so it could not be heard/hacked by radio equip. available to the general public. This cheap radio equipment is the bog standard meter. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Tim Kelleher - 62nd post - 22 May 2003 23:19
Hi Carol,
"Homeopathic medicine the same as electronic medicine." "..not possible to measure biological fields".

Depends on which branch of electronic medicine you are referring to. Some Homeopaths do biomagnetic or radionic treatments. "Radionics" is not taken that seriously in Britain (banned in the USA). A SQUID magnetometer (superconducting quantum interference device) can measure magnetic fields as low as 10 to power of -13 Tesla, from Brain tissue. The heart's magnetic field is much stronger, in the 10 to the power of -10 Tesla range. I think only the Brain is affected by Homeopathic medicines. The subtle e/m radiation of the medicines is mimmicking one of the Brain's own internal communication systems - the one which controls symptoms and their perception. These medicines cause PERCEIVED symptoms around the body (of an artificial disease, Hahnemann called it), just false signals. The Brain has been instructed to give the patient the perception of these symptoms, and actually feel pain in the foot, for example. But, symptom management is in the Brain. Homeopaths never rub a homeopathic solution on the foot, for example - it acts only centrally, or holistically, on the Brain; taken by mouth or inhaled, or just close to face in sensitive cases reported Hahnemann. The perception of a symptom in the foot, for instance, is actually communicated to the patient's consciousness by the Brain. Let me ramble then; the Homeopathic medicine is in the form of e/m radiation imitating the e/m range used by some high-level "symptom management" process in the Brain, possibly related to the PNI axis (Homeostatic control system thought to be centred in the Hypothalamus/Pituitary region, near centres which sense and control circulating blood chemistry). Will think more about how this might work. Bye. Tim [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 16th post - 24 May 2003 02:18
Okay - how's this for weird rubbish. Suppose it is possible to view the 'aura' (energy field) around a living thing (I know people who make this claim - or you can look into Kirlian Photography). The energy field reflects the state of health of the physical body but can also be used to heal it. Disease creates changes in this 'aura'- such as gaps or weak areas. 'Energy' medicine (the likes of homeopathy, Bach flower remedies, Radionics, Acupuncture ......) unblocks or 'replaces' the missing areas in order to transfer the 'healing' to the physical body. Some energy medicines rely on a 'middle man' to transfer this healing energy (homeopathic tablets, the radionics box, the acupuncture needle) but ultimately it is an energy transfer from ...where...(zero point field?) which could be carried out by a healer (spiritual or whatever) directly (lots of experimental data to show that 'healing' works, if you want to look for it). Therefore the effects that were seen in the homeopathic experiment were not reliant on the homeopathic preparations, but the ability of the persons involved to transfer that energy. (James Randi and associated sceptics thus having a negative effect on such transfer - not unheard of, I believe.) Just had an idea - how about repeating the experiment with Jacques Benveniste, but slipping him 'pure' water instead of what he thinks is homeopathic dilutions and see if 'the experimentor effect' produces positive results?? [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Clare D - 133rd post - 27 May 2003 14:19
what you just described (slipping in some 'fake' treaments just made of water) is exactly what is meant by a "control" - you make some real treatments and some fake, and see if there's a difference. But wait, hold on...THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT JAMES RANDI DOES! That was the whole point of having him involved! There are some important things to bear in mind here:
1) neither the person applying the treatments or the person analysing the results (or the patients, if it's being tested on humans) should know whether they're using the real thing or not, until AFTER all the results are in. This is known as doing the experiment "double blind".

2) when a new drug, for example, is being tested on humans, the "control" group (who just get water) will show a significant improvement. This is not because the experimenter had some magical electronic effect on the water, it's a psychological effect known as the placebo effect.

3) we know the placebo effect is psychological rather than physical, because it only happens when you test something on humans. In the test shown on TV, they were using in vitro tests purely to exclude this effect. The fact that they got negative results with the all treated samples means that the experimenter DIDN'T have any effect on the solution tested.

The test shown on TV was a perfect example of exactly the type of test you are proposing. So why do you place so much emphasis on doing the whole thing all over again?! [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 39th post - 28 May 2003 12:32
Yes, I realise that! The point I am (unsuccessfully it seems) trying to make is that they could do an experiment to show that the experimenter DID have an effect (magical you say, but "the experimenter effect" is a known phenomenon) on the results. Not by any devious means, but by 'expecting' a particular result. (It has been proven that people can affect the outcome of a Random Event Generator which theoretically should be impossible, so why can't they affect experiments such as the Horizon one at a quantum level?) It would be a different experiment of course, but the basis of it would be the same. It would be proving the 'experimentor effect', not whether Homeopathy works or not. [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy Clare D - 139th post - 28 May 2003 15:40
There can indeed be an experimenter effect on results due to people 'expecting' certain results. This is nothing psychic etc, it is due to the testers unconsciously INTERPRETING the results as being different (not MAKING the results actually physically BE different). And there is no convincing evidence showing any influence of people on random number generators - no decent controls are even done and the statistics are generally very dodgy.
In this test, the people analysing the results DIDN'T KNOW what samples they were analysing - whether treated or unteated. So it is not possible for them to have had any negative interpretation on one specific set of test results - they wouldn't have known what results to 'affect'. And this is all part of the reason why people say that homeopathy etc works on animals - they know which animals have been treated and INTERPRET that the treated animals have a better rate of improvement than untreated ones. Usually there is no real comparison anyway - it's just an anecdote where someone says "I treated my dog and it got better" - anecdotes are utterly worthless as evidence, no matter how many you collect. Do you know of any double-blind tests that have been done animals? I would be willing to bet that either none have been done or that they saw no effect beyond placebo.

This really needs to be stressed - the reason that scientific tests are done the way they are is to EXCLUDE experimenter influence. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 41st post - 28 May 2003 20:02
Okay, whatever you say. But the work of Roger Nelson, Brenda Dunne et al looks pretty convincing. On another note, how about Remote Viewing? If that is a load of bunkum, why did the US Defence Department organise military personnel to be trained in it? And the training course still continues......
Regarding homeopathy and animals, many farmers use nosodes (homeopathic 'vaccination') to prevent mastitis in their herds - and say it is the most reliable method. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy J C - 422nd post - 28 May 2003 22:16
Vanessa,
you say...."On another note, how about Remote Viewing? If that is a load of bunkum, why did the US Defence Department organise military personnel to be trained in it? And the training course still continues......"

Vanessa, I strongly suggest you spend less time reading the more bizarre sites on the internet and more time thinking for yourself. Remote viewing is garbage - there is no evidence that it works and no mechanism by which it could.

Even if the US military did spend time on this nonsense - and I don't put it past them - don't you remember the old truism...."definition of oxymoron: military intellegence" [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 44th post - 29 May 2003 17:34

Ingo Swann has provided plenty of correlated evidence and the mechanism by which it works has not been found.....yet. You can see for yourself that the CIA and the US Department of Defence spent millions of dollars on training people in the technique - it is possible for anyone to learn - so why not have a go yourself, before you criticize things you obviously haven't a clue about. [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Vanessa Keeler - 39th post - 28 May 2003 12:33
By the way, how does the placebo effect explain that homeopathy works on animals? [reply]

re: Electronic V Homeopathy carol rae - 123rd post - 23 May 2003 17:48
Tim,
Who is the expert on these SQUID magnetometers? [reply]


re: Electronic V Homeopathy Tim Kelleher - 66th post - 24 May 2003 14:05
Carol,
They are scientific instruments that have been around for over 30 years, but are now more sensitive than ever. The expert would be the Scientist using it for Bio-medical studies, or work in Physics. There is a specific type of Squid called MEG for brain function studies.

PASTE

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a functional imaging tool for medicine and fundamental investigations of brain function. We use the Aston University 19 channel superconducting magnetometer to measure the very weak magnetic fields.

There's a latest SQUID at Cardiff University, being used for Biomagnetism research.

A company called PTB in Germany a developed a SQUID magnetometer module that surrounds the sample being studies and is able to measure ALL THREE VECTOR COMPONENTS of the magnetic field.

As regards the expert on it, I don't know. There is plenty out there if you do a Yahoo search on Squid magnetometers. I know a little - what's the question? Tim [reply]
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Old 21st October 2008, 02:29 PM
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Kaviraj is on a distinguished road
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Dr. Albert Abrams


and




Ken Raines





The electronic technique has been conceived by a master mind. It is far more intricate and ironclad than medical fads of the past. It deals with a new form of energy which, we are told, cannot be detected by the physicist's most delicate instruments, but can be detected by the abdominal reflexes under the guidance of an electronic diagnostician. These reactions are said to be affected by the presence of skeptical minds.... It has given rise to all sorts of occultism in medicine. It has been a renaissance of the black magic of medieval times. It has given free reign to idiotic ideas...

Scientific American, September, 1924, p. 222.







Dr.Albert Abrams of San Francisco began to make some astounding medical claims in the early 1920s. His claims were so outrageous as to be viewed by many as absurd on its face. He claimed that all substances radiated electronic vibrations that could be detected and measured. All human organs, diseased and healthy, transmitted radiation or "vibrations" unique to that organ or disease. All that was needed from a patient for diagnosis was a drop of blood, a single hair, or even a handwriting sample as these would give off the unique "vibrations" of that individual. Not only were diseases ascertained by a drop of blood or handwriting, but one could determine a person's religion, golf handicap, sex, age, present location, when that person would die, and innumerable other tidbits of information.
Did Abrams discover something of significance? Was the scientific diagnosis and cure of every conceivable disease within reach? This became a huge controversy in the early 1920s when the famous author, Upton Sinclair, wrote the article "The House of Wonders" for Pearson's Magazine in June of 1923 which promoted Dr. Abrams' theory and methods. This led to numerous articles on the E.R.A. in popular magazines both pro and con. The scientific and medical communities in the United States and Britain were forced to respond to this situation. Two scientific investigations were conducted to get to the bottom of the matter.
Who was Dr. Abrams and how did his peers in the medical community view his theory and methods? What did the scientific investigations of his claims and methods discover?

Background and training
Albert Abrams was born in San Francisco in 1863. [1] In his teen years he learned German and graduated as an MD from Heidelberg in 1882. He became Professor of Pathology at Cooper College in San Francisco in 1893 and resigned in 1898. [2] He was also elected vice-president of the California State Medical Society in 1889 and made president of the San Francisco Medico Churgical Society in 1893. [3] By the early 1900s Abrams had become a respected expert in neurology. [4] By all accounts, Abrams had a respectable background and promise of a distinguished career.

Spondylotherapy
In 1910 Abrams published a book on a medical technique he called Spondylotherapy. This volume "constituted his first definite departure from medical orthodoxy."[5] Even in Abrams' estimation, his "spondylotherapy" was his version of Chiropractic and Osteopathy which were viewed as "cults" by "orthodox" medicine at the time. [6] For this reason Dr. Abrams began to be viewed with some suspicion and concern by his peers for promoting questionable medical practices.

The electronic reactions of Abrams



An ERA practitioner using the "percussive" method. Nurse in background is "localizing" an infected tooth.


In 1916, when Abrams published his New Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment book, he had been experimenting with what came to be called "the electronic reactions of Abrams" or the E.R.A. This was a complete departure from conventional medicine and those in the medical community were not hesitant to call him a quack as a result.
Describing the E.R.A. can be difficult due to its complex nature and theory as well as the numerous methods and devices used. Briefly, the theory behind the E.R.A. was the human body transmitted radiation or "electronic vibrations" from the atomic level, specifically from the electrons. These electronic vibrations emanating from the electrons, if normal, would vibrate at a specific rate, if they vibrated at an abnormal rate, it would cause or indicate the presence of disease. Each disease vibrated at a unique rate. In this theory, one could cure disease by transmitting back at the disease the same electronic vibratory rate it was transmitting. This would neutralize the abnormal vibrations and allow the electrons to return to normal vibration rates and eliminate the disease. Abrams believed that drugs worked when they had the same or similar "vibrations" as the disease they cured.
How Abrams detected and normalized these "electronic vibrations" of diseases was bizarre and complex. He would take a hair, handwriting or blood sample (sometimes a photograph) of a patient to be diagnosed. This would be placed into a device he called a Dynamizer. This was hooked up by wires to a headpiece to be worn on a healthy individual (called a reagent) who, while facing west, would "react" biologically through the central nervous system to the diseased "vibrations". These "reactions" could be detected by percussing (thumping) the abdomen of the reagent which would reveal areas of "dullness." The location of the dullness (a dull note sounded when thumped) and its size would indicate the precise disease and its location in the patient.
The precise rate of vibrations were ascertained by boxes containing resistance coils which were also hooked up by wires to the reagent and Dynamizer. Dials would be turned to different "ohmage" rates once the disease was identified. This would pinpoint the exact amount and rate of the disease the patient had. Sometimes horseshoe magnets were placed over the reagent's head to "clear" him of extraneous "vibrations" to get a better "reaction."
Methods used later by Abrams and his followers involved stroking the reagent's abdomen with a glass rod to obtain the "reactions." Later the reagent was dispensed with altogether and the operator stroked a plate hooked up to the Dynamizer, etc. with his fingers to feel the "vibrations" from the patient's blood or handwriting.
In all this, numerous things could interfere with the vibrations as they were sensitive in more ways than one. In collecting a blood sample, the patient had to be facing west in dimmed light. No strong orange or red colored material could be present in the room. The same was true when getting the reactions from the reagent to the sample. In addition to the above, reactions could be driven away by the presence of skeptical minds or enhanced by other mental activity. For these reasons, most have compared the E.R.A. to psychic phenomena, sympathetic magic and the occult.
Abrams had another device called an oscilloclast which he used to cure patients. This machine supposedly transmitted back at the diseased tissue the same electronic vibrations it was emitting until the patient was "clear" of the electronic reactions in the reagent. The best account of how Abrams came up with this theory and how he developed these strange methods is given in the pro-E.R.A. book, Report on Radionics. [7]


"Orthodox" Medicine and the ERA

The AMA and Dr. Albert Abrams
The American Medical Association (AMA) never did take Dr. Albert Abrams' claims seriously. No formal investigation of Abrams' methods was ever undertaken by the AMA.[8] The AMA believed Abrams' methods and claims were ridiculous on the face of it, and that it therefore wasn't worth the time and money to investigate it. The AMA commented on Dr. Abrams and the ERA in their two periodicals: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), and Hygeia (changed to Today's Health in 1950), the latter being a magazine on health issues for the general public. Both were edited by Dr. Morris Fishbein during the 1920s and 1930s. Fishbein also wrote numerous articles for various popular level magazines on quackery. These were published in book form in 1925 as The Medical Follies. This was followed by The New Medical Follies in 1927 and both were combined and updated in 1932 as Fads and Quackery in Healing.

JAMA
JAMA began commenting on Dr. Albert Abrams and the ERA in response to readers' letters, beginning with their March 25, 1922, issue (pp. 913-914). This and following articles appeared in "The Propaganda for Reform" section of the Journal that dealt with quackery. The articles mainly presented some of the clearly ridiculous claims and experiments that Dr. Abrams made with the ERA, such as carrying around on one's person a cut potato for curative and diagnostic purposes, his claim that numbers and vowels have a "sex," experiments with determining the outcome of a chicken's sex before it is born, determining the religion and present location of a patient from a drop of blood or handwriting sample, etc. [9]
A couple JAMA articles dealt with Medical Associations that made the decision to either charge MDs that used Abrams' oscilloclast with "unethical conduct" for promoting and using quackery, or expelling from their society those who used it. [10] Some JAMA articles recounted tests by other's of ERA practitioners' diagnostic ability by sending them blood samples in the mail as requested. In one case, a blood sample from a fictitious "Miss Bell" and another from a fictitious "Mrs. Jones" were actually blood samples of a male guinea-pig. "Miss Bell" was diagnosed as having various ailments including a streptococcus infection of the "the left [fallopian] tube". [11] Another article presented the results of a similar test of an ERA practitioner who was sent the blood of a rooster. The "innocent" and apparently virtuous rooster was diagnosed as having a venereal disease![12] JAMA also noted that the California State Journal of Medicine invited Dr. Abrams to participate in a scientific test to see how accurate his ERA tests were in diagnosing diseases. Abrams "flat-footedly" refused. [13]

Hygeia and Today's Health
The AMA's popular level magazine Hygeia contained numerous articles on quackery and medical "cults" it believed the public should be informed of and warned about. The Hygeia articles on medical fads and quackery continually referred to Abrams as a quack, even stating he may have been the greatest quack of the 20th century:
IF SOME ONE were to set about the task of selecting the greatest medical quack in history, he would find a long list of colorful competitors.... In recent times, our country has produced no greater charlatan than Albert Abrams... the founder of the "electronic" and "radionic" hokum that still flourishes among many medical cults. [14]
As James Graham of Celestial Bed fame easily ranked first among quacks of his generation, so the name of Albert Abrams (1863-1924) leads all the rest in the history of medical charlatanry in the first quarter of the present century. [15]
The rankest piece of quackery of our present generation was that of Albert Abrams, whom HYGEIA called "the most finished medical charlatan of our time." [16]
Many Hygeia articles in the 1920s and 1930s on quackery mentioned Abrams or recounted his story.[17] As late as 1939 they printed a full length article on Abrams' life and quackery. [18] Most of the Hygeia articles, like the JAMA articles, ridiculed Abram's bizarre experiments, instruments, and claims, such as his "Reflexaphone" device which allowed him to diagnose and even treat patients over the phone. [19]
The successor to Hygeia was Today's Health. It also printed many articles on fads and quackery in medicine during the 1960s. Some of these were still pointing back to Abrams, his theories and devices, as these were still being used by Chiropractors and others in updated versions as late as the 1960s. [20]

Dr. Morris Fishbein
Dr. Morris Fishbein's first book, The Medical Follies, became an influential best seller. His 1932 book, Fads and Quackery became a classic in the field and was referred to by many authors who wrote on the subject of quackery in the coming decades. [21] All three books by Fishbein dealt with Dr. Albert Abrams. Like the AMA literature, he ridiculed Abrams numerous outrageous claims, methods and endless gadgets. He also made it a point to mention how much money Abrams was making as the result of his "practice." He believed quackery was perpetrated for the revenue it generated. Abrams was reportedly worth $2,000,000 when he died in 1924. Courses in Spondylotherapy and the ERA went for $200.00 a head with the terms being cash &endash; in advance. His oscilloclast was leased at around $200.00 with a monthly $5.00 charge thereafter. The lessee was required to sign a contract stating he would never open the device. [22] These things were pointed out by Fishbein to show that to him, the whole thing was a sham operation designed to "separate sick people from their money" as the Watchtower Society later claimed about radionics.

"These Cults": A Response to Fishbein
In 1926, Annie Hale wrote the book, "These Cults" as a response to Morris Fishbein's 1925 The Medical Follies. [23] It defended the medical "cults" from Fishbein's attacks. These included Chiropractic, Osteopathy, Naturopathy and others including the "electronic reactions of Abrams." Her chapter on Abrams covered pages 80-106.
Her complaints about the AMA's attacks on Abrams such as Fishbein's book was that it was an a priori attack without investigating it (p. 81). She complained that Abrams was the "storm center of medical rancor and hate" (p. 84). As an example, she mentioned JAMA's review of Abrams' book Spondylotherapy that was "a long sarcastic review... a gratuitous slap at its author"(p. 87).
In Abrams' defense she said he was "one of the most educated men of his day" (p. 84). She mentioned a few prominent individuals who supported the E.R.A., the most prominent one being Sir James Barr, a past president of the British Medical Association. As would be the case after the Scientific American and Thomas Horder committees' investigation of the E.R.A., she only briefly mentioned the Scientific American investigation and paid much attention to a few positive statements by the Horder committee and ignored their mostly negative conclusions (see below).

British Medical Societies and the E.R.A.
British medical journals also mentioned Abrams and the E.R.A. much in the same vein as the AMA including ridiculing Dr. Abrams' bizarre claims, experiments and gadgets. [24] One of the gadgets mentioned, the "sphygmobiometer", was used by Abrams in court to determine the father of a child in a paternity case based on the "vibrations" of a blood sample! [25]



Scientific Investigations of the ERA


Science journals such as Nature commented as well on the Abrams controversy. [26] It wasn't taken any more seriously there than by the medical community. A long Scientific Monthly article on quacks called Abrams a "queer freak," outdoing even JAMA 's and Hygeia's name calling. [27]
Two major scientific investigations were done on the ERA in 1923 and 1924 to get past the rancor, charges and counter charges. One was conducted by a committee set up by the Scientific American, the other was conducted by a committee headed by Sir Thomas Horder in Britain. Of the two, the Scientific American investigation was the most comprehensive.
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Old 21st October 2008, 02:29 PM
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Dr. Albert Abrams


and




Ken Raines





The electronic technique has been conceived by a master mind. It is far more intricate and ironclad than medical fads of the past. It deals with a new form of energy which, we are told, cannot be detected by the physicist's most delicate instruments, but can be detected by the abdominal reflexes under the guidance of an electronic diagnostician. These reactions are said to be affected by the presence of skeptical minds.... It has given rise to all sorts of occultism in medicine. It has been a renaissance of the black magic of medieval times. It has given free reign to idiotic ideas...


Scientific American, September, 1924, p. 222.









Dr.Albert Abrams of San Francisco began to make some astounding medical claims in the early 1920s. His claims were so outrageous as to be viewed by many as absurd on its face. He claimed that all substances radiated electronic vibrations that could be detected and measured. All human organs, diseased and healthy, transmitted radiation or "vibrations" unique to that organ or disease. All that was needed from a patient for diagnosis was a drop of blood, a single hair, or even a handwriting sample as these would give off the unique "vibrations" of that individual. Not only were diseases ascertained by a drop of blood or handwriting, but one could determine a person's religion, golf handicap, sex, age, present location, when that person would die, and innumerable other tidbits of information.
Did Abrams discover something of significance? Was the scientific diagnosis and cure of every conceivable disease within reach? This became a huge controversy in the early 1920s when the famous author, Upton Sinclair, wrote the article "The House of Wonders" for Pearson's Magazine in June of 1923 which promoted Dr. Abrams' theory and methods. This led to numerous articles on the E.R.A. in popular magazines both pro and con. The scientific and medical communities in the United States and Britain were forced to respond to this situation. Two scientific investigations were conducted to get to the bottom of the matter.
Who was Dr. Abrams and how did his peers in the medical community view his theory and methods? What did the scientific investigations of his claims and methods discover?

Background and training
Albert Abrams was born in San Francisco in 1863. [1] In his teen years he learned German and graduated as an MD from Heidelberg in 1882. He became Professor of Pathology at Cooper College in San Francisco in 1893 and resigned in 1898. [2] He was also elected vice-president of the California State Medical Society in 1889 and made president of the San Francisco Medico Churgical Society in 1893. [3] By the early 1900s Abrams had become a respected expert in neurology. [4] By all accounts, Abrams had a respectable background and promise of a distinguished career.

Spondylotherapy
In 1910 Abrams published a book on a medical technique he called Spondylotherapy. This volume "constituted his first definite departure from medical orthodoxy."[5] Even in Abrams' estimation, his "spondylotherapy" was his version of Chiropractic and Osteopathy which were viewed as "cults" by "orthodox" medicine at the time. [6] For this reason Dr. Abrams began to be viewed with some suspicion and concern by his peers for promoting questionable medical practices.

The electronic reactions of Abrams



An ERA practitioner using the "percussive" method. Nurse in background is "localizing" an infected tooth.


In 1916, when Abrams published his New Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment book, he had been experimenting with what came to be called "the electronic reactions of Abrams" or the E.R.A. This was a complete departure from conventional medicine and those in the medical community were not hesitant to call him a quack as a result.
Describing the E.R.A. can be difficult due to its complex nature and theory as well as the numerous methods and devices used. Briefly, the theory behind the E.R.A. was the human body transmitted radiation or "electronic vibrations" from the atomic level, specifically from the electrons. These electronic vibrations emanating from the electrons, if normal, would vibrate at a specific rate, if they vibrated at an abnormal rate, it would cause or indicate the presence of disease. Each disease vibrated at a unique rate. In this theory, one could cure disease by transmitting back at the disease the same electronic vibratory rate it was transmitting. This would neutralize the abnormal vibrations and allow the electrons to return to normal vibration rates and eliminate the disease. Abrams believed that drugs worked when they had the same or similar "vibrations" as the disease they cured.
How Abrams detected and normalized these "electronic vibrations" of diseases was bizarre and complex. He would take a hair, handwriting or blood sample (sometimes a photograph) of a patient to be diagnosed. This would be placed into a device he called a Dynamizer. This was hooked up by wires to a headpiece to be worn on a healthy individual (called a reagent) who, while facing west, would "react" biologically through the central nervous system to the diseased "vibrations". These "reactions" could be detected by percussing (thumping) the abdomen of the reagent which would reveal areas of "dullness." The location of the dullness (a dull note sounded when thumped) and its size would indicate the precise disease and its location in the patient.
The precise rate of vibrations were ascertained by boxes containing resistance coils which were also hooked up by wires to the reagent and Dynamizer. Dials would be turned to different "ohmage" rates once the disease was identified. This would pinpoint the exact amount and rate of the disease the patient had. Sometimes horseshoe magnets were placed over the reagent's head to "clear" him of extraneous "vibrations" to get a better "reaction."
Methods used later by Abrams and his followers involved stroking the reagent's abdomen with a glass rod to obtain the "reactions." Later the reagent was dispensed with altogether and the operator stroked a plate hooked up to the Dynamizer, etc. with his fingers to feel the "vibrations" from the patient's blood or handwriting.
In all this, numerous things could interfere with the vibrations as they were sensitive in more ways than one. In collecting a blood sample, the patient had to be facing west in dimmed light. No strong orange or red colored material could be present in the room. The same was true when getting the reactions from the reagent to the sample. In addition to the above, reactions could be driven away by the presence of skeptical minds or enhanced by other mental activity. For these reasons, most have compared the E.R.A. to psychic phenomena, sympathetic magic and the occult.
Abrams had another device called an oscilloclast which he used to cure patients. This machine supposedly transmitted back at the diseased tissue the same electronic vibrations it was emitting until the patient was "clear" of the electronic reactions in the reagent. The best account of how Abrams came up with this theory and how he developed these strange methods is given in the pro-E.R.A. book, Report on Radionics. [7]


"Orthodox" Medicine and the ERA

The AMA and Dr. Albert Abrams
The American Medical Association (AMA) never did take Dr. Albert Abrams' claims seriously. No formal investigation of Abrams' methods was ever undertaken by the AMA.[8] The AMA believed Abrams' methods and claims were ridiculous on the face of it, and that it therefore wasn't worth the time and money to investigate it. The AMA commented on Dr. Abrams and the ERA in their two periodicals: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), and Hygeia (changed to Today's Health in 1950), the latter being a magazine on health issues for the general public. Both were edited by Dr. Morris Fishbein during the 1920s and 1930s. Fishbein also wrote numerous articles for various popular level magazines on quackery. These were published in book form in 1925 as The Medical Follies. This was followed by The New Medical Follies in 1927 and both were combined and updated in 1932 as Fads and Quackery in Healing.

JAMA
JAMA began commenting on Dr. Albert Abrams and the ERA in response to readers' letters, beginning with their March 25, 1922, issue (pp. 913-914). This and following articles appeared in "The Propaganda for Reform" section of the Journal that dealt with quackery. The articles mainly presented some of the clearly ridiculous claims and experiments that Dr. Abrams made with the ERA, such as carrying around on one's person a cut potato for curative and diagnostic purposes, his claim that numbers and vowels have a "sex," experiments with determining the outcome of a chicken's sex before it is born, determining the religion and present location of a patient from a drop of blood or handwriting sample, etc. [9]
A couple JAMA articles dealt with Medical Associations that made the decision to either charge MDs that used Abrams' oscilloclast with "unethical conduct" for promoting and using quackery, or expelling from their society those who used it. [10] Some JAMA articles recounted tests by other's of ERA practitioners' diagnostic ability by sending them blood samples in the mail as requested. In one case, a blood sample from a fictitious "Miss Bell" and another from a fictitious "Mrs. Jones" were actually blood samples of a male guinea-pig. "Miss Bell" was diagnosed as having various ailments including a streptococcus infection of the "the left [fallopian] tube". [11] Another article presented the results of a similar test of an ERA practitioner who was sent the blood of a rooster. The "innocent" and apparently virtuous rooster was diagnosed as having a venereal disease![12] JAMA also noted that the California State Journal of Medicine invited Dr. Abrams to participate in a scientific test to see how accurate his ERA tests were in diagnosing diseases. Abrams "flat-footedly" refused. [13]

Hygeia and Today's Health
The AMA's popular level magazine Hygeia contained numerous articles on quackery and medical "cults" it believed the public should be informed of and warned about. The Hygeia articles on medical fads and quackery continually referred to Abrams as a quack, even stating he may have been the greatest quack of the 20th century:
IF SOME ONE were to set about the task of selecting the greatest medical quack in history, he would find a long list of colorful competitors.... In recent times, our country has produced no greater charlatan than Albert Abrams... the founder of the "electronic" and "radionic" hokum that still flourishes among many medical cults. [14]
As James Graham of Celestial Bed fame easily ranked first among quacks of his generation, so the name of Albert Abrams (1863-1924) leads all the rest in the history of medical charlatanry in the first quarter of the present century. [15]
The rankest piece of quackery of our present generation was that of Albert Abrams, whom HYGEIA called "the most finished medical charlatan of our time." [16]
Many Hygeia articles in the 1920s and 1930s on quackery mentioned Abrams or recounted his story.[17] As late as 1939 they printed a full length article on Abrams' life and quackery. [18] Most of the Hygeia articles, like the JAMA articles, ridiculed Abram's bizarre experiments, instruments, and claims, such as his "Reflexaphone" device which allowed him to diagnose and even treat patients over the phone. [19]
The successor to Hygeia was Today's Health. It also printed many articles on fads and quackery in medicine during the 1960s. Some of these were still pointing back to Abrams, his theories and devices, as these were still being used by Chiropractors and others in updated versions as late as the 1960s. [20]

Dr. Morris Fishbein
Dr. Morris Fishbein's first book, The Medical Follies, became an influential best seller. His 1932 book, Fads and Quackery became a classic in the field and was referred to by many authors who wrote on the subject of quackery in the coming decades. [21] All three books by Fishbein dealt with Dr. Albert Abrams. Like the AMA literature, he ridiculed Abrams numerous outrageous claims, methods and endless gadgets. He also made it a point to mention how much money Abrams was making as the result of his "practice." He believed quackery was perpetrated for the revenue it generated. Abrams was reportedly worth $2,000,000 when he died in 1924. Courses in Spondylotherapy and the ERA went for $200.00 a head with the terms being cash &endash; in advance. His oscilloclast was leased at around $200.00 with a monthly $5.00 charge thereafter. The lessee was required to sign a contract stating he would never open the device. [22] These things were pointed out by Fishbein to show that to him, the whole thing was a sham operation designed to "separate sick people from their money" as the Watchtower Society later claimed about radionics.

"These Cults": A Response to Fishbein
In 1926, Annie Hale wrote the book, "These Cults" as a response to Morris Fishbein's 1925 The Medical Follies. [23] It defended the medical "cults" from Fishbein's attacks. These included Chiropractic, Osteopathy, Naturopathy and others including the "electronic reactions of Abrams." Her chapter on Abrams covered pages 80-106.
Her complaints about the AMA's attacks on Abrams such as Fishbein's book was that it was an a priori attack without investigating it (p. 81). She complained that Abrams was the "storm center of medical rancor and hate" (p. 84). As an example, she mentioned JAMA's review of Abrams' book Spondylotherapy that was "a long sarcastic review... a gratuitous slap at its author"(p. 87).
In Abrams' defense she said he was "one of the most educated men of his day" (p. 84). She mentioned a few prominent individuals who supported the E.R.A., the most prominent one being Sir James Barr, a past president of the British Medical Association. As would be the case after the Scientific American and Thomas Horder committees' investigation of the E.R.A., she only briefly mentioned the Scientific American investigation and paid much attention to a few positive statements by the Horder committee and ignored their mostly negative conclusions (see below).

British Medical Societies and the E.R.A.
British medical journals also mentioned Abrams and the E.R.A. much in the same vein as the AMA including ridiculing Dr. Abrams' bizarre claims, experiments and gadgets. [24] One of the gadgets mentioned, the "sphygmobiometer", was used by Abrams in court to determine the father of a child in a paternity case based on the "vibrations" of a blood sample! [25]



Scientific Investigations of the ERA


Science journals such as Nature commented as well on the Abrams controversy. [26] It wasn't taken any more seriously there than by the medical community. A long Scientific Monthly article on quacks called Abrams a "queer freak," outdoing even JAMA 's and Hygeia's name calling. [27]
Two major scientific investigations were done on the ERA in 1923 and 1924 to get past the rancor, charges and counter charges. One was conducted by a committee set up by the Scientific American, the other was conducted by a committee headed by Sir Thomas Horder in Britain. Of the two, the Scientific American investigation was the most comprehensive.
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Old 21st October 2008, 02:30 PM
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1. The Scientific American investigation
The adventures of Alice in Wonderland are tame in comparison of those of an investigator in the land of ERA.

Scientific American, April, 1924, p. 240.

In 1923 and 1924, the Scientific American magazine put together an investigation committee and investigated the "electronic reactions of Abrams". The investigation lasted about one year and cost the Scientific American $20,000 in 1923/1924 dollars. The Scientific American reported on the progress of the investigation in each monthly issue from October, 1923 to September, 1924.
In the second installment in the series they printed the results of their first test of an E.R.A. practitioner in New York City. [28] The practitioner was to diagnose the diseases contained in six vials. These contained pure germ cultures from diseased patients. The results of this first test was typical of the rest the Scientific American conducted with E.R.A. diagnosticians. The results were published in a chart reprinted here (numbers are "ohmage" rates of disease).



Each tube containing a pure germ culture of one specific disease was diagnosed as a host of diseases. For example, tube #2, which simply contained Pneumacoccus (a bacterium that causes pneumonia), was diagnosed as being syphilis, tuberculosis, septococcus, malaria and the flu, at which the committee decided that was enough diagnosing, which they called a "broadside". "The purity of the germ culture was questioned" by the doctor. There was no such thing as a pure germ culture according to the doctor. After a few more tests, the doctor "sought some reason for his flat failure". The Scientific American reported:
He asked to look at one of the pure germ culture vials. Looking at it in full light, presumably for the first time, he discovered the red edge on the label, as well as the blue handwriting. Right then and there Dr. X found the reason for his unsuccessful diagnosis. He explained to us that red is fatal to the accuracy of the electronic reactions! The presence of that bit of red on each label was sufficient to upset the reactions completely.... Furthermore, there was handwriting on our labels. No doubt the electronic emissions from the writer of those labels were being carried along in the diagnosis. If so, the writer of those labels must have been in a terrible state of health--and mind, so we reflected at the time. [29]
This was typical of the problems and obstacles the committee faced in testing E.R.A. practitioners. They accommodated such complaints by taking pains to eliminate any possible electronic contaminations. For example, in the above case, after "Dr. X" complained about the red edged labels and the blue handwriting, the committee had new labels attached in accordance with the doctor's specs, such as typing the numbers on plain labels, etc. Further testing, as their chart indicated, resulted in "broadside upon broadside" diagnoses that were completely off the mark. Further tests with other E.R.A. practitioners using various techniques in the following months resulted in complete failures as well. [30]
Additional strange complaints and requests of the doctor in the above case were common in the various Scientific American tests. Dr. X several times during the tests requested that all those present:
... and especially the reagent, keep their minds off the pure germ cultures.... It seems that even the thoughts of those present have a serious electronic effect on the reagent and the accuracy of the diagnosis. Sensitive-super-sensitive, these reactions! [31]
Later, in mentioning an ongoing correspondence with Dr. Abrams in which he said he would "demonstrate" his technique but not submit to test by their committee, they wrote:
Dr. Abrams, it will be noted, calls attention to the psychological factor. He indicates that when the E.R.A. diagnostician is working under test conditions, he is at a decided disadvantage because of his anxiety regarding the outcome of the test. From time to time we have been warned against a skeptical turn of mind, for such a state on the part of the investigator has a decidedly detrimental influence on the reactions... [32]
The committee came to the conclusion that the E.R.A. was occultic or psychic in nature. Before beginning the test with Doctor X in their first test, they said the preliminaries (subduing the light in the room, etc.) reminded them "in no little degree of a psychic seance"(p. 203). After tests with other doctors that included similar and even more bizarre claims and procedures ("queer" they said), they came to the conclusion that:
The whole thing bears striking resemblance to the subjective psychic phenomena. Compare it to the ouija board.... Compare it with automatic writing.... The ERA technique works-when it does work-in just this way.[33]
They also noted frequently its occult nature:
Dr. Abrams claimed that his electronic diagnosis enabled him to tell how old was the donor of the drop of blood, whether he was white, black, red or yellow; what diseases he was suffering now; what diseases could be expected in the future... and the expectancy of life. If additional information was desired, Dr. Abrams could tell the religion, the racial traits, and even the location of the individual at any given moment. In fact, during one of his classroom demonstrations he received a photograph of a young man, placed it in the dynamizer, found the young man to be insane as a result of serious syphilitic condition, and then, running an electrode over a map, located the individual at Stockton, Cal. Photographs, strands of hair, handwriting and many other things intimately connected with an individual could be used for electronic diagnosis in place of a drop of blood. The thing was uncanny. It bordered on occultism.[34]
Dr. Abrams himself diagnosed his own "life expectancy" and predicted his death would occur in January of 1924 based on his own E.R.A. diagnosis, which was fulfilled. [35]
After one year of tests and $20,000 dollars spent, the Scientific American committee's conclusion as to the scientific basis of the E.R.A. was that it was "the height of absurdity" and "utterly worthless". Their official statement was:
This committee finds that the claims advanced on behalf of the electronic reactions of Abrams, and of electronic practice in general, are not substantiated; and it is our belief that they have no basis in fact. In our opinion the so-called electronic treatments are without value. [36]

2. The Thomas Horder committee
In 1924, a British committee was put together to investigate an adaptation or modification of Abrams' E.R.A. apparatus and technique by Dr. W.E. Boyd of Glasgow. This committee's investigation and mostly negative conclusions are intriguing and a little puzzling to me. It has given rise to debate and claims that the E.R.A. was vindicated by this committee by those who endorse radionics.
A report of the committee's findings were recorded in both The Lancet and the British Medical Journal in January of 1925. [37] Basically, the tests of Dr. Boyd were at first complete failures. He was asked to differentiate between two different substances placed in the Dynamizer at random. His results were much less than what would be expected by chance. A physicist was also employed for six months to determine if "any effect measurable or detectable by orthodox physical apparatus was associated with the so-called 'reactions'. No such change could be found, and this aspect of the work was ultimately abandoned." [38]
However, after complaining about electronic interference, Dr. Boyd undertook further tests at his insulated residence with Whatley Smith of the committee in which he was able to differentiate between substances with remarkable accuracy. For example, he determined when a sample of saliva on filter paper was placed in the Dynamizer correctly 25 times in a row. This was estimated at being done by chance alone at 1 in 33,554,432. Most of the other tests thereafter yielded nearly 100 per cent accuracy. Was Mr. Smith deceived by Dr. Boyd due to his having more control over the experiments at his own residence?
The entire committee repeated the tests later with Dr. Boyd and obtained similar results. The entire committee was "satisfied" that the results were accurate. Overall the committee obtained numerous negative results with other E.R.A. practitioners of the Abrams and Boyd variety when dealing with diagnosing diseases, much like the Scientific American. However, they obtained some success from Dr. Boyd in differentiating certain non pathological substances such as "sulfer" and saliva. Their four stated conclusions were as follows:
(1) That certain substances , when placed in proper relation to the emanometer of Boyd, produce, beyond any reasonable doubt, changes in the abdominal wall of "the subject" of a kind which may be detected by percussion. This is tantamount to the statement that the fundamental proposition underlying, in common, the original and certain other forms of apparatus designed for the purpose of eliciting the so-called electronic reactions of Abrams, is established to a very high degree of probability.
(2) That no evidence justifying this deduction is yet available from the work of those who practice with the apparatus as yet designed by Abrams himself.
(3) That the phenomena appear to be extremely elusive, and highly susceptible to interference, so that in order to obtain reliable results it is necessary to take the most elaborate precautions, particularly as regards the elimination of effects due to irrelevant objects.
(4) That it would be premature at the present time even to hazard in the most tentative manner any hypothesis as to the physical phenomena here described. [39]
The first conclusion has of course been quoted by just about every pro-E.R.A. individual since then as confirming the E.R.A. However, this had nothing to do with the diagnosing of disease as the successful tests were done on non pathological substances such as saliva and sulfer. As the committee said after their above conclusions:
It is impossible to emphasize too strongly that nothing in this Communication is to be taken as implying that any correlation of those changes in the abdominal wall, referred to in conclusion (1), with pathological conditions has yet been shown, or a fortiori, that any justification-- physical, pathological, nosological, or clinical--exists for the direct use of either the Abrams or the Boyd apparatus in diagnosis or treatment.
This was further emphasized in the closing remarks of the committee's Communication which has been quoted by numerous critics of the E.R.A.:
To sum up. The conclusions arrived at in this Communication leave the practicing electronist as scientifically unsound and as ethically unjustified as it was before. They give no sanction for the use of E.R.A. in the diagnosis or in the treatment of disease. Nor does there appear to be any other sanction for this kind of practice at the present time. [40]
This Communication was delivered before the Royal Society of Medicine. At the end it was put to a vote as to whether the matter should be discussed further then or at a later time. Neither was decided, the matter simply dropped for the most part and hasn't been taken up again as far as scientific investigations are concerned. Some magazines picked up the controversy during 1925 based on the Horder report, but this quickly died out. [41]

Abrams' Legacy
After the Scientific American and Thomas Horder investigations, the E.R.A. lost most of its credibility. A few individuals carried on with the E.R.A. The major individuals in its later development were George De la Warr and Dr. Ruth Drown. Drown was the last major E.R.A. practitioner in America. The AMA dealt with her claims the way they did with Abrams, including recounting investigations and tests of her techniques similar to the rooster and guinea pig and Scientific American variety which found no basis for her claims. She was twice charged with fraud and died awaiting her second trial. [42] To my knowledge, "radionics" and associated devices are considered fraudulent by the U.S. Government and using it to diagnose and treat diseases is now illegal.
Due to the endorsement of Sir James Barr and the Horder report on the E.R.A., England has had more tolerance for radionics. The writer has read books published there in the 1960s and early 1970s that were still pointing out individuals using radionics without much government interference there. The last reference to individuals such as Chiropractors practicing radionics on patients in the U.S. was in the early 1960s. [43] Today, the only ones supporting radionics on either continent are those involved in the occult and the New Age movement. [44]
One occult spiritual group that supported the E.R.A. after the scientific investigations that denounced it were the Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) who supported it until 1953. [45] Individuals within the movement even invented new radionics devices to cure fellow JWs of diseases including cancer. [46] Today, radionics is considered quackery and to be occultic, psychic and spiritistic in nature by JWs. [47]


[For pictures of Abrams' "Reflexaphone", an early Oscilloclast see this link]



References:
1. Russell, Edward, Report on Radionics, (London: Neville Spearman), p. 17. Other sources put his birth in 1864 (Fishbein, Morris,The Medical Follies, (New York: Boni & Liveright), 1925, p. 99). There has been some uncertainty about his date of birth as Abrams apparently put the dates 1862, 1863 and 1864 for his birth in various sources. For a discussion of this see Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA ), 78:1072(April 8, 1922).
2. Report, p. 18; Follies, p. 99; Hygeia, January, 1939, p. 53.
3. Follies, p. 99.
4. Report, p. 18.
5. Follies, p. 99, JAMA 78:913.
6. JAMA, 78:913.
7. Russell, Edward, Report on Radionics, (London: Neville Spearman)
8. One AMA magazine article said the AMA joined in with the Scientific American investigation of the ERA, but I haven't been able to confirm this. Kaplan, Jack, "The Health Machine Menace: THERAPY BY WITCHCRAFT," Today's Health, February, 1961, p. 83.
9. JAMA, 78: 1072, 1334-5, 1832-33; 79: 92; 80: 1317-18.
10. JAMA, 80:1245, 1459.
11. JAMA, 80:1317.
12. JAMA, 81:493.
13. JAMA, 78:1832-33.
14. Hygeia, January, 1939, p. 53.
15. Hygeia, May, 1938, p. 462.
16. Hygeia, January, 1936, p. 26.
17. See for example, Cramp, Arthur, "Electric and Magnetic Cure-alls," Hygeia, May, 1938, pp. 439-441, 462, 479, 480; Kovacs, Richard, "Health Gadgets for the Gullible," Hygeia, January, 1936, pp. 24-28.
18. Page, Ernest W., "Portrait of a Quack," Hygeia, January, 1939, pp. 53-55, 92, 95.
19. Hygeia, January, 1939, p. 55.
20. Holbrook, Stewart, "The Golden Age of Quackery," Today's Health, 38: 52-3, 82-85 (November, 1960); Kaplan, Jack, "Therapy by Witchcraft," Today's Health, 39:28-31, 81-87 (February, 1961).
21. For example, Martin Gardner in his popular 1957 book, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science had a chapter on quackery that relied on Fishbein's book for its content. Gardner also mentions Abrams.
22. JAMA, 78:913-14.
23. Hale, Annie, "These Cults" (New York: National Health Foundation), 1926.
24. The Lancet, Jan. 26, 1924, pp. 176-178, 191.
25. The Lancet, Jan. 26, 1924, p. 177.
26. "The Abrams' Cult in America," Nature, 113:809-10 (June 7, 1924), 114: 525-6(October 11, 1924).
27. Gibbes, Dr. J. Heyward, "Quacks and Quackeries," The Scientific Monthly, November, 1925, pp. 533-550 (p. 542.).
28. Scientific American, November, 1923, pp. 306, 307, 370.
29. Scientific American, November, 1923, p. 307.
30. Scientific American: April, 1924, pp. 278-80, 281; May, 1924, pp. 313, 361-2; June, 1924, p. 383, etc.
31. Scientific American, November, 1923, p. 370.
32. Scientific American, January, 1924, pp. 69, 70.
33. Scientific American, March, 1924, p. 212.
34. Scientific American, Sept., 1924, p. 160.
35. Scientific American, March, 1924, p. 214.
36. Scientific American, Sept., 1924, p. 159.
37. The Lancet, January 24, 1925, pp. 177-181; British Medical Journal, January 24, 1925, pp. 179-185.
38. Forum, 4: 201 (August, 1925).
39. The British Medical Journal, January 24, 1925, p. 184.
40. The British Medical Journal, January 24, 1925, p. 185; The Lancet, January 24, 1925, p. 181.
41. Smith, Whatley and Fishbein, Morris, "Abrams-Scientist or Quack?", Forum, August, 1925, pp. 199-207; "The Inquiry into the Abrams "Dynamizer" and Similar Apparatus", Discovery, March, 1925, pp. 107-110; Spectator, January 24, 1925, pp. 112-113.
42. See JAMA, 112:1853-4(May 6, 1939), 142:506-7(Feb. 18, 1950); Gardner, Martin, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, (New York: Dover Publications), 1957, pp. 209-211.
43. Holbrook, Stewart, "The Golden Age of Quackery," Today's Health, 38: 52-3, 82-85 (November, 1960); Kaplan, Jack, "Therapy by Witchcraft," Today's Health, 39:28-31, 81-87 (February, 1961).
44. See for example Hartman, Jane, Shamanism For the New Age: A Guide to Radionics and Radeisthesia, (Placitas, NM: Aquarian Systems, Inc.), 1987.
45. The Golden Age: February 25, 1925, pp. 323-4; April 22, 1925, 451-455; November 30, 1927, pp. 138-9; April 30, 1930, pp. 483-93, February 18, 1931, pp. 338-342; Awake!, September 22, 1953, pp. 20-23.
46. The Golden Age, April 22, 1925, pp. 451-455.
47. The Watchtower, November 15, 1962, pp. 679-680; Awake!, January 8, 1963, pp. 12-14; The Watchtower, June 15, 1982, pp. 25-26.
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Old 21st October 2008, 02:37 PM
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By posting the above it should be noted that these are the views of others on the subject matter. I may not agree with them.
Today, many researchers are doing similar things and i have contacts with several. They have been published and endorsed. Again, this says nothing about the value of their work, just like the above posts are dismissive, without anyone of those involved may have had an inkling of the subject.
One GW Crile wrote a seminal book on The Bipolar Theory of Living Processes. He won a Nobel prize for something that Abrams and Boyd developed further.
Shows you how so-called scientific men judge things when it comes from a mainstream surgeon (Crile) or from a few homoeopaths (Abrams and Boyd).
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Old 21st October 2008, 07:09 PM
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Dear Kaviraj
Thought you might like to read an article I wrote regards this matter:


HOMEOPATHY AND RADIAESTHESIA




-Gina Tyler, D Hom


The Mystery Of Morphogenesis: How the Actual Forms of Living Things Come Into Being
What controls the homeostatic principle of life? What force animates matter? To be "alive", what does that mean? What are these invisible forces? These questions have always been debated. Can we find the mysteries of life under a microscope? For instance, health and disease have been 100% misdiagnosed by modern allopathic MDs, looking with their noses under their microscopes. Viruses, bacteria, cell destruction, atom and gene manipulations are all tackled with a limited perspective. A world full of linear and analytical thinking.

There is a bioenergetic phenomenon of inter-connected forces mentioned in "the Tao of Physics". An interface between quantum physics and the ancient cosmology of the Chinese ying/yang. This interaction of western and eastern cultures brings us to how this bioenergetic field relates to all living matter. Modern science has somewhat caught up to these mystic forces, having to acount for unexplained energies.
Human knowledge is limited and efforts are made to unravel the mysteries of nature, including the healing arts. In India's ayurveda, there is a system based on Sankhya that deals with dualism; two realities called prakriti and purusa. Disturbances can occur in this equillibrium. As Hahnemann said in the Organon of Medicine - "It is the morbidly affected vital force that produces disease."
Homeopathy is a method of healing the mind, body, and soul via means of energy. The homeopathic remedies resonate various frequencies of vibrational energy (bioenergy). Allopathy is a purely physical application of treatments. This limits its span, depth, and level of interaction, such as: inherited traits, past trauma, dream states, internal spiritual conflicts, miasmatic imprints and emotional imbalances.
Homeopathy is thought to be only a placebo; modern machinery cannot measure the contents of a homeopathic remedy, for instance: belladona 200c is harmless and has no side effects and yet the physical properties of the fresh belladona herb are a few of the most deadly toxins on earth. By the succusion methods of prepairing homeopathic remedies, other vibrational levels are reached. There are vibrational levels in all organic life forces. A homeopath, Dr. Grimmer, remarks, "there is something beyond all the material things we see around us. Homeopathy reaches up into other planes; mental and spiritual. That is why it cures. That is why it can wipe out inherited conditions."
"In the state of health the spirit like vital force (dynamis) animating the material organism reigns in supreme sovereignty."- Quote from Samuel Hahnemann -"The Organon".
Radiaesthesia goes one step further. This subject has always caught my attention. Starting with the place I was born in Java, Indonesia. Many medicine men and shamans were called upon for healing. These healing extraordinary powers of super energy surges, being able to have effects on others without being present in the same room or the same town. Via meditation this energy can be accessed by these experienced healers.
No special tools, no harmful prescription drugs, only the transfer of energy. This also has been used in negative ways, such as the methods of voodoo in Haiti, which were made from the hair of the person that was to be affected. Radiaesthesia needs no meditation, no spells, no shamans with magical powers, but it works on the same level. Homeopathic radiaesthesia must be done by an experienced homeopath. The patient must be asked the same tedious questions sometimes taking up to 2 hours each case. Questions regard their physical ailments, it's symptoms, modalities, mental, emotional, sleep states, dreams, eating likes and dislikes, traumas, family disease history, sexual habits, inherited traits (miasms), fears, and of course the objective observance of the patient (physical characteristics, nervous habits, odors, facial notations, tongue and nail, diagnosis, etc.).
After the entire case has been researched then the constitutional remedy can be found. From this constitutional remedy it's satelite remedies compliment and the patients miasmatic pre disposed background appears. Radiaesthesia uses the patients own hair to transmit the energy from one location to another. (Photographs or finger nails can also be used.)
As in ancient cultures hair and nails were considered the same as the person it came from, holding the same aura and vibrational patterns. American Indians are cautious about having their photos taken due to the belief that ones soul is now partly in the picture. How does a homeopathic treatment given on a photograph reach the owner? There is no difference between a photograph and the person, the frequency (wave length) of energy in its aura is the same. (The same applies to a person's signature.) Some can see these auras and most of us cannot. Auras change colors when a person is ill from an emotional or physical disease.
American Indians of many tribes still to this day have the belief that part of them is in the photo when it is taken of them. It's thought to be a mere superstition. Yet these Indians have had this "knowledge" for thousands of years. How did they come across this information? By ancestors? By trance? In Princeton University 1951, Curtis Upton, a civil engineer, and Howard Armstrong industrial chemist did many studies on the use of photographs and agriculture to control pests.
The theory behind the system was so bizarre, they said that the molecular and atomic make up on the photograph would resonate at identical frequencies of the objects that they represented pictorially. So by affecting the photograph with pesticides they believed the actual plants would be poisoned. (Used in infintesimal doses like homeopathy.) And it worked.
All of this may sound farfetched, but it has all been tested on many cases. B.Jain Publishers located in New Delhi has lists of examples of cured cases of cancer, abnormal lumps in abdomen, leprosy, rheumatic fever, epilepsy, uterine hemorrhage, high blood pressure, asthma, polio, heart palpitations, etc.. Most of these recorded cases of homeopathic radiaesthesia were done from 1969 thru 1972.
In most of these recorded cases, instant results appeared (4-10 minutes). A reaction of some sorts to confirm the correct remedy and/or correct potency of this remedy.
Homeopaths will agree that to find the correct potency requires study and time of trial and error. So the theory and mechanism of radiaesthesia via hair transmission proves beneficial confirming the potency and/or remedy choice instantly to follow up with future oral dosing of that same formula.
In the first stages of my study on hair tranmissions using homeopathy years ago, I used my son as an experiment, wanting to see for myself if this all really works. To keep it simple, I used my son's acute symptom of epistaxis (bleeding from the nose).
From previous homeopathic dosing, I already knew what remedy to give him to stop the bleeding. I proceeded to pluck one hair, with the root, from his head, placing it in a small dish with a few drops of water and the homeopathic indicated remedy (root end in the solution). All the while he was in another room. I noticed an immediate response from him yelling, "My nose stopped bleeding!". I made a notation of the fact and then I continued to try it in reverse (which is not normally done), taking the hair out of the solution and cleaning it off.
He immediately started to panick and blood proceded once again. Normally a homeopath would give an oral dose immediately after confirmation of radiaesthesia hair transmission to continue the healing process.
Ancient approaches of balancing energy... the Chinese call it ch'i, the Hindus call it prana, homeopaths and quantum physics call it vital force.
1- Low frequency electromagnetic field. 2- Nonelectrical subtle energy field (ch'i - the universal life energy).
Disharmony can happen at any level beyond the physical, such as in the etheric, astral, and mental levels. For example: the astral body experiences expression and repression of emotion. This dysfunction can cause an imbalance in the physical body (illness).
Consciousness is a type of energy. Using insight to reach higher frequencies, it can interact with its environment in several dimensions. (including in its dream state.) Modern allopaths do not address multidimensional humans (only the physical). This is why forms of energy healing such as accupuncture, reiki, balancing of chakras, prayer, chanting, and now homeopathy are looked upon as a rebalancing of blocked energy instead of surpressing via invasive surgery and toxic drugs.
An illness is also looked at from another perspective such as a life style change, a transformation to move our consciouness, or a learning tool/gift.
To be threatened by a terminal disease, one taps into negative and positive energy. One can escalate fear, then death. The other , peace and healing.
As I observed in India, the homeopathic cancer patients are never told that they have the disease. Where the mind goes, the body will follow.
Homeopathy works on all of these subtle levels, most of which we do not understand. My favorite experiment is that of my own solution for car motion sickness. Over an over I have personally experienced an instant relief of headache and nausea by just holding a homeopathic remedy in my left hand. For the acute illness motion sickness there is no need to swallow pills.
Radiaesthesia can also be done with color therapy, gem therapy, and magnetic therapy. These are all forms of vibrational energy. In 1967, Dr. Bhattacharya of Calcutta, a homeopath from India, did extensive research on these other forms of radiaesthesia. Using photographs, he said, "Stop and think... realize we all are actually an individual with no replica on this entire earth. This is indisputable, thus a photo bears all his personal characteristics."
Every living being is radiating at a particular frequency. That is why their features are different from another person. This frequency does not change throughout his life, from young, to old. That is why when several people have the same illness, several individual remedies must be given according to their own separate vibrational identity.
In allopathy the same prescription drug is given to thousands with like illness. This makes no sense unless we as humans were all "indentical in everyway". And we know this is false. Nature heals with a minimum of matter, yet with maximum effect. Nature uses subtler forces to reach our energy fields and our energy body. Curing did not mean the mere treating of the visible body.
The Mystical Properties of Hair:The relationship between separated hair and the body. Ritual shaving of a child's hair...Why some cultures place hair in a sacred place... An imbalance of any illness shows in the hair itself. For instance: a homeopath can look at Alopecia Areatta and relate this to the syphlitic miasm. Placing human hair in any garden keeps away the neighborhood cats. Animals feel the presence of the owners via the hair...how? The Chinese burn human hair into an ash to stop bleeding. It works, but why and how?
In some cultures hair from all family members are used to create intertwined art pieces as keepsakes for bonding purposes. As long as the owner of the hair itself is still alive, the hair obtained for transmission purpose has all its energetic properties needed.
Kirlian photographs show the same auric field in attached or detached hair, nails, and limbs of any human being. These photos take pictures of the aura, corona discharge, or prana, all are one and the same.


Bibliography
  • Transmission of HomeoDrug energy from a Distance - By Dr. B Sahni
  • Unfathomed Regions of Homeopathy - By Dr. S. Alam
  • Bihabi Bioenergetic Medicines East and West - By Manning and Vanranen
  • Teletherapy - By Dr. A.K. Bhattacharya
  • Vibrational Medicine - By R. Gerber MD
  • The Power of Rays - S.G.J. Ouseley
(Published at www.homeorizon.com on Wednesday, Sep 24, 2008)
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Old 21st October 2008, 07:31 PM
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Quote from Gina
Homeopaths will agree that to find the correct potency requires study and time of trial and error.

I find that the potency is as much a matter of the law of similars as the remedy.
Hence low potency is used for those with low vitality, medium for medium vitality and high for those with a high vitality. from experience i have noticed that this is a rule not to be broken, if you want to avoid problems.

As for the rest of your piece - I have used Sahni~s ideas since the early 80s and have clients all over the world, from Hawaii to India and from Australia to Moscow Russia. Since many people do not know where to buy remedies - inavailable, illegal or otherwise restricted - i use mainly photographs for this transmission. With of course great results.
Your piece gives a nice exposition and a logical sequence in the explanation. Congrats.
Keep up the good work.
For the German publishers of my book, I am at present editing Grimmer#s work. He was quite ahead of his time. Abrams and Boyd were too - pity the AMA got to them before their work was popular enough. Of course the AMA never investigated it - it was used by osteopaths and such~quacks~ and therefore a priory condemned.
I bet the Randi followers on these threads will fall over themselves in condemning it too - who cares? Those ignoramuses that condemn that which is beyond their most fantastic ken will always condemn medical progress - real progress that is, as opposed to the empirical quackery that constitutes orhtodox medicine, with its ever-newer drugs.
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Old 21st October 2008, 07:49 PM
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btw, are you familiar with the work of GW Crile?
The Bipolar Theory of Living Processes
This is a very interesting book, from which Abrams and Boyd took their leave in the development of their machines for measuring the sick body and the remedies to cure them.
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Old 22nd October 2008, 10:26 PM
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are you familiar with the work of GW Crile?
No I am not familiar with this work,sounds interesting will look into it,Thanks!

Also thanks for the kind words and reading my article.

I bet the Randi followers on these threads will fall over themselves in condemning it too - who cares? Those ignoramuses that condemn that which is beyond their most fantastic .................................................. ...........................
If we cared about what these skeptics think homeopathy would be in the sorry state allopathy is in now.

Regards the importance of potency please see october issue of Ezine at www.Hpathy.com
many many articles on this subject.
October Issue - Alize Timmerman, C4 Potencies, Homeopathy Posology, LM Potencies, Homeopathic Approach in Paediatrics, A Dialogue with Simon Taffler, Homeopathic Community in the United States, Aesculapias in the Balance (1805), Measuring Your Success Rate; Cases of Natrum mur, Brassica and Phosphorus; Argentine Method of Pure Homeopathy; Homeopathy in Cuba; Effects of High Dilutions, Answers of George Vithoulkas.
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Old 16th May 2009, 03:33 PM
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have you read of the works of Rupert Sheldrake,Vincent Speckhart?
Fredric
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